Ardennes 1944

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What to expect

Penguin presents the unabridged, downloadable, audiobook edition of Ardennes 1994 by Antony Beever, read by Sean Barrett.

On 16 December 1944, Hitler launched his ‘last gamble’ in the snow-covered forests and gorges of the Ardennes on the Belgian/German border. Although Hitler’s generals were doubtful of success, younger officers and NCOs were desperate to believe that their homes and families could be saved from the vengeful Red Army approaching from the east. The Ardennes offensive, with more than a million men involved, became the greatest battle of the war in western Europe.

In January 1945, when the Red Army launched its onslaught towards Berlin, the once-feared German war machine was revealed to be broken beyond repair. The Ardennes was the battle which finally broke the Wehrmacht.

Critics Review

  • Like Beevor’s magisterial account of the Second World War, Ardennes 1944 benefits from the same depth of field, seamlessly shifting its point to focus from the macro level to the micro and back again

    Scotland on Sunday
  • What leaves a lasting impression is the huge power the American army as a whole mustered to smash back the Germans. A superpower was being born

    Bookseller, Interview with Antony Beevor
  • Rich in detail and drama. Enthralling

    Mail on Sunday
  • A superb addition to the canon which has taken us from Stalingrad to Normandy in 1944 and the final gruesome battle for Berlin, not forgetting the masterly single-volume history of the entire war. It is written with all of Beevor’s customary verve and elegance. His remarkable and trademark ability is to encompass the wide sweep of campaigns yet never forget the piquant details of what happened to the individual . . . He focuses brilliantly on the key moments that turned the battle

    Evening Standard
  • As impeccably researched, insightfully observed and superbly written as its bestselling predecessors

    Sunday Express
  • If there’s one thing that sets Beevor apart from other historians – beyond his gifts as a storyteller – it’s that he is not afraid to look at the most uncomfortable, even frightening subjects, but does so in a way that doesn’t threaten the reader. It’s like having Virgil there to lead you through the underworld: he doesn’t leave you stranded amid the horror but leads you back again, a wiser person for having undergone the journey

    Daily Telegraph

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