Justice

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What to expect

The unabridged, downloadable audiobook edition of Michael J Sandel’s, Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do? Read by the author himself.

Considering the role of justice in our society and our lives, Michael Sandel reveals how an understanding of philosophy can help to make sense of politics, religion, morality – and our own convictions. Breaking down hotly contested issues, from abortion, euthanasia and same-sex marriage, to patriotism, dissent and affirmative action, Sandel shows how the biggest questions in our civic life can be broken down and illuminated through reasoned debate. Justice promises to take readers – of all ages and political persuasions – on an exhilarating journey to confront today’s political and moral controversies in a fresh and enlightening way.

Critics Review

  • A spellbinding philosopher…. For Michael Sandel, justice is not a spectator sport…. He is calling for nothing less than a reinvigoration of citizenship

    The Nation
  • Hard cases may make bad laws, but in Michael Sandel’s hands they produce some cool philosophy…. Justice is a timely plea for us to desist from political bickering and see if we can have a sensible discussion about what sort of society we really want to live in

    The Observer
  • Justice is a lucid and compelling analysis of our current moral dilemmas, which argues for a new commitment to citizenship and the common good

    Shirley Williams
  • In the beautifully concise explanations of American philosopher Michael Sandel, I see great insight into our current predicaments. If any political reckoning is on its way . . . then perhaps it might come from the philosophy department of Harvard

    Madeleine Bunting
  • Michael Sandel, perhaps the most prominent college professor in America,…practices the best kind of academic populism, managing to simplify John Stuart Mill and John Rawls without being simplistic. But Sandel is best at what he calls bringing ‘moral clarity to the alternatives we confront as democratic citizens’…. He ends up clarifying a basic political divide – not between left and right, but between those who recognize nothing greater than individual rights and choices, and those who affirm a ‘politics of the common good,’ rooted in moral beliefs that can’t be ignored

    Washington Post
  • An ambitious and an appealing idea. Intriguingly, I find myself persuaded that it might well be worth a try

    Lisa Jardine, The Times

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